The Mission Update blog provides background and information on the latest developments across all aspects of the ISDC's mission.

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Previously tactical officer Neeraj Anahira took us through the process of achieving an EMDAR track on an opponent vessel, known as a ‘hunt’. In this post he describes the ‘kill’ – preparing and firing a torpedo that hits its target (without putting his own vessel in danger).

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There have been a few exciting updates to vessel systems recently and an initial look at some of the systems coming up on the delivery roadmap.

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Lieutenant Neeraj Anahira provides a blow-by-blow account of his experience commanding a hunt/kill mission.

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Remote simulators are now available, allowing crew to get valuable hands-on time with vessel systems without leaving home.

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Crew training will be critical to mission success, but technical manuals and operating procedures aren’t enough. Simulating deep space operating conditions as closely as possible will allow the crew to go beyond basic technical knowledge and begin developing tactics and strategies.

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Even more important than the technology and resources behind Endeavour’s construction is the preparation of the crew who will carry out the ISDC's deep space mission.

Every successful space program has recognised the training and preparedness of its crews as critical to the success of the mission. This has typically been achieved by beginning training and simulation programs well in advance of completion of construction and the ISDC is doing the same.

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Meet the flight operations console - more commonly referred to as “the helm”. It’s a multipurpose workstation that will allow a Quartermaster to fly the ship across three navigation modes. The current focus is on the most commonly used mode – impulse navigation.

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Maintaining awareness of what’s happening in space around the ship is one of the most critical functions performed by the tactical team. Unlike in science fiction other vessels don’t just automatically appear on “long range sensors”. They can only be detected and tracked by the radiation they emit, ideally before they have a chance to detect your own ship.

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Trainee quartermasters (helm operators) are now able to experience what it will be like to have a starship under their control. Engine prototyping has provided sufficient data to enable simulations of vessel maneuvering at impulse (sublight) speeds.

“We were anticipating the experience to be more like operating a large submarine,” says Master Chief Sonya Akakios, the ISDC’s most senior quartermaster. “What we’re actually seeing isn’t too far off that, with the most obvious difference being momentum.”

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With design and prototyping of key vessel systems well advanced, attention is being turned to the skills and training Endeavour’s crew will need to carry out our deep space mission. The most fundamental skills are maneuvering the ship and maintaining full operational awareness of the surrounding space.